who will be there?


New speaker announced every Friday

 
Keefer Dunn   Keefer Dunn is a licensed architect based in Chicago, Illinois. He is a sole practitioner, an active member of the  Architecture Lobby , a lecturer at the  School of the Art Institute of Chicago , and the host of a radio show about architecture and politics called  Buildings on Air .

Keefer Dunn

Keefer Dunn is a licensed architect based in Chicago, Illinois. He is a sole practitioner, an active member of the Architecture Lobby, a lecturer at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and the host of a radio show about architecture and politics called Buildings on Air.

Dr Emina Kristina Petrović   Dr Emina Kristina Petrović teaches at the School of Architecture, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand, where she is also the Postgraduate Programmes Director and the First Year Coordinator. Emina is deeply committed to the great need of sustainable change and that an active rethinking of the built environment has a critical role to play in this process. In much of her work, Emina actively teaches grass-root action and student-led activism as one of the key activators for the betterment of the world. Emina currently serves as an editor of the Journal of Green Building, member of the steering group of Sustainability and Resilience Distinctiveness Theme of Victoria University of Wellington, and a member of Advisory group of the Sustainability Society – a technical interest group of IPENZ. Her research focusses on sustainable building materials through examination of their conceptual and practical roles. The particular area of her expertise is in the impacts building materials can have on human health in indoor environments.

Dr Emina Kristina Petrović

Dr Emina Kristina Petrović teaches at the School of Architecture, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand, where she is also the Postgraduate Programmes Director and the First Year Coordinator. Emina is deeply committed to the great need of sustainable change and that an active rethinking of the built environment has a critical role to play in this process. In much of her work, Emina actively teaches grass-root action and student-led activism as one of the key activators for the betterment of the world. Emina currently serves as an editor of the Journal of Green Building, member of the steering group of Sustainability and Resilience Distinctiveness Theme of Victoria University of Wellington, and a member of Advisory group of the Sustainability Society – a technical interest group of IPENZ. Her research focusses on sustainable building materials through examination of their conceptual and practical roles. The particular area of her expertise is in the impacts building materials can have on human health in indoor environments.

Bend Yoga Sydney  will be our wellness keynote with a delicious yoga class. A 45 minute yoga flow (you will sweat, bring a mat and towel). Prior to yoga, the founder of Bend Yoga,  Estelle Rose , will be providing some valuable insight and information on work-life-balance in Architecture. As an architecture graduate from Sydney, ex-congress director (Agency 2017) and lover of all things health and well-being, she is very excited to share what she has learnt and what she thinks is important to take on board when you enter the workforce. Things like advice on how to manage time and find balance in the strenuous tasks of an architects daily life and how to get it done and not work late nights.

Bend Yoga Sydney will be our wellness keynote with a delicious yoga class. A 45 minute yoga flow (you will sweat, bring a mat and towel). Prior to yoga, the founder of Bend Yoga, Estelle Rose, will be providing some valuable insight and information on work-life-balance in Architecture. As an architecture graduate from Sydney, ex-congress director (Agency 2017) and lover of all things health and well-being, she is very excited to share what she has learnt and what she thinks is important to take on board when you enter the workforce. Things like advice on how to manage time and find balance in the strenuous tasks of an architects daily life and how to get it done and not work late nights.

Peggy Deamer    Peggy Deamer is Professor Emerita of Yale University’s School of Architecture and principal in the firm of Deamer, Studio. She is the founding member and the Content Coordinator of the Architecture Lobby, a group advocating for the value of architectural design and labor. She is the editor of Architecture and Capitalism: 1845 to the Present and The Architect as Worker: Immaterial Labor, the Creative Class, and the Politics of Design. She is co-editor of Building in the Future: Recasting Architectural Labor; BIM in Academia; and Re-Reading Perspecta. Articles by her have appeared in Log, Avery Review, e-Flux, and Harvard Design Magazine amongst other journals. Her work explores the relationship between subjectivity, design, and labor in the current economy.    Website

Peggy Deamer

Peggy Deamer is Professor Emerita of Yale University’s School of Architecture and principal in the firm of Deamer, Studio. She is the founding member and the Content Coordinator of the Architecture Lobby, a group advocating for the value of architectural design and labor. She is the editor of Architecture and Capitalism: 1845 to the Present and The Architect as Worker: Immaterial Labor, the Creative Class, and the Politics of Design. She is co-editor of Building in the Future: Recasting Architectural Labor; BIM in Academia; and Re-Reading Perspecta. Articles by her have appeared in Log, Avery Review, e-Flux, and Harvard Design Magazine amongst other journals. Her work explores the relationship between subjectivity, design, and labor in the current economy.


Website

Dr Rebecca Kiddle   Becky is Ngāti Porou and Ngā     Puhi and is a Senior Lecturer at the Architecture School, Victoria University of Wellington. Her research focuses on Māori identity and placemaking in Aotearoa New Zealand and the nexus between community creation, social processes and urban design. She also works to develop better participatory design processes to ensure rangatahi and tamariki voices are heard in built environment decision-making processes.  She has a PhD and MA in urban design from Oxford Brookes University, UK and under-graduate degrees in Politics and Māori studies. She is co-editor of the Our Voices series along with Prof. Kevin O’Brien (Australia) and Dr Iuugigyoo Patrick Stewart (Turtle Island) which includes Our Voices: Indigeneity and Architecture (2018) and the forthcoming (2020) Our Voices II: The Decolonial Project. She is co-chair Pōneke of the Ngā Aho Network for Māori Designers.

Dr Rebecca Kiddle

Becky is Ngāti Porou and Ngā Puhi and is a Senior Lecturer at the Architecture School, Victoria University of Wellington. Her research focuses on Māori identity and placemaking in Aotearoa New Zealand and the nexus between community creation, social processes and urban design. She also works to develop better participatory design processes to ensure rangatahi and tamariki voices are heard in built environment decision-making processes.

She has a PhD and MA in urban design from Oxford Brookes University, UK and under-graduate degrees in Politics and Māori studies. She is co-editor of the Our Voices series along with Prof. Kevin O’Brien (Australia) and Dr Iuugigyoo Patrick Stewart (Turtle Island) which includes Our Voices: Indigeneity and Architecture (2018) and the forthcoming (2020) Our Voices II: The Decolonial Project. She is co-chair Pōneke of the Ngā Aho Network for Māori Designers.

Byron Kinnaird   Byron Kinnaird is a regulator, researcher and artist, with a deep interest in the cultures and organisations of the architecture profession. Trained in Wellington and Melbourne, he has practiced as an educator and researcher for over a decade in New Zealand and Australia. His current work at the NSW Architects Registration Board leverages research and policy to promote a better understanding of architectural issues in the community, with a particular interest in public service, well-being and professional education. Byron is a co-director of the Freerange Press who publish the Radical Futures series. Byron comes from Whakatāne and currently lives in the Blue Mountains.

Byron Kinnaird

Byron Kinnaird is a regulator, researcher and artist, with a deep interest in the cultures and organisations of the architecture profession. Trained in Wellington and Melbourne, he has practiced as an educator and researcher for over a decade in New Zealand and Australia. His current work at the NSW Architects Registration Board leverages research and policy to promote a better understanding of architectural issues in the community, with a particular interest in public service, well-being and professional education. Byron is a co-director of the Freerange Press who publish the Radical Futures series. Byron comes from Whakatāne and currently lives in the Blue Mountains.

Adam Nathaniel Furman    Adam Nathaniel Furman  is a London based designer & artist of Argentine, Japanese and Israeli heritage whose practice ranges from Architecture & interiors, to sculpture, installation, writing and product design. He pursues research through his studio 'Productive Exuberance' at Central St Martins, and the Research Group 'Saturated Space' which he runs at the Architectural Association, exploring colour in Architecture and Urbanism through events, lectures and publications.     Instagram    Website

Adam Nathaniel Furman

Adam Nathaniel Furman is a London based designer & artist of Argentine, Japanese and Israeli heritage whose practice ranges from Architecture & interiors, to sculpture, installation, writing and product design. He pursues research through his studio 'Productive Exuberance' at Central St Martins, and the Research Group 'Saturated Space' which he runs at the Architectural Association, exploring colour in Architecture and Urbanism through events, lectures and publications.

Instagram

Website

Rau Hoskins , Ngāti Hau, Ngāpuhi is a director of design TRIBE architects and coordinator of Te Hononga centre for Māori Architecture and Appropriate Technologies. Rau has worked in the fields of Māori architecture and cultural landscapes, design research and Māori housing advocacy for the last 25 years. The focus of his presentation at dissent 2019 is on embedding Māori cultural landscape design approaches in architectural education and design practice in Aotearoa. Rau will reference the application of Te Aranga design principles that he co-developed in 2012 along with project based customised mana whenua design principles.

Rau Hoskins, Ngāti Hau, Ngāpuhi is a director of design TRIBE architects and coordinator of Te Hononga centre for Māori Architecture and Appropriate Technologies. Rau has worked in the fields of Māori architecture and cultural landscapes, design research and Māori housing advocacy for the last 25 years. The focus of his presentation at dissent 2019 is on embedding Māori cultural landscape design approaches in architectural education and design practice in Aotearoa. Rau will reference the application of Te Aranga design principles that he co-developed in 2012 along with project based customised mana whenua design principles.

Justine Clark  is an architectural editor, writer, researcher and critic. She is a co-founder of Parlour: women, equity, architecture and established the Parlour website. A former editor of Architecture Australia, Justine now consults to built environment organisations, institutions and practices. Justine is active in public discussions of architecture and has organised many events, curated exhibitions and sat on national and international juries. Her work has won awards for architecture in the media and her contribution to the profession was recognised with the Marion Mahony Prize in 2015. Her writing appears in both the scholarly and professional press, and she has worked on topics including gender and architecture, architectural criticism, architectural drawing and postwar modernism. She is co-author, with Dr Paul Walker, of the book Looking for the Local: Architecture and the New Zealand Modern (2000). Justine is an honorary senior research fellow at the University of Melbourne, Australia.

Justine Clark is an architectural editor, writer, researcher and critic. She is a co-founder of Parlour: women, equity, architecture and established the Parlour website. A former editor of Architecture Australia, Justine now consults to built environment organisations, institutions and practices. Justine is active in public discussions of architecture and has organised many events, curated exhibitions and sat on national and international juries. Her work has won awards for architecture in the media and her contribution to the profession was recognised with the Marion Mahony Prize in 2015. Her writing appears in both the scholarly and professional press, and she has worked on topics including gender and architecture, architectural criticism, architectural drawing and postwar modernism. She is co-author, with Dr Paul Walker, of the book Looking for the Local: Architecture and the New Zealand Modern (2000). Justine is an honorary senior research fellow at the University of Melbourne, Australia.

Dr Camia Young   My experience weaves together architecture, property development, community development and entrepreneurship. I am passionate about building the 21st Century city and creating the foundations for the Age of Belonging. The work I do involves building bridges towards creating equitable distribution of wealth while creating places to develop meaningful connections with each other and the planet. Since moving to Christchurch in 2011, I have been involved in several community minded initiatives including Ohu (Office for Holistic Urbanism), Exchange Christchurch (XCHC), Te Pūtahi: Christchurch Centre for Architecture and City Making, the Gap Filler Pallet Pavilion, and Studio Christchurch. Before moving to New Zealand, I practiced as an Architect in Europe with OMA in Holland and Herzog & de Meuron in Switzerland and worked on several large-scale civic projects and urban master plans. I serve as a Trustee on the Hillary Institute board, the Ohu Foundation board and I am the Founding Partner of Ohu Development and Founding Director XCHC.

Dr Camia Young

My experience weaves together architecture, property development, community development and entrepreneurship. I am passionate about building the 21st Century city and creating the foundations for the Age of Belonging. The work I do involves building bridges towards creating equitable distribution of wealth while creating places to develop meaningful connections with each other and the planet. Since moving to Christchurch in 2011, I have been involved in several community minded initiatives including Ohu (Office for Holistic Urbanism), Exchange Christchurch (XCHC), Te Pūtahi: Christchurch Centre for Architecture and City Making, the Gap Filler Pallet Pavilion, and Studio Christchurch. Before moving to New Zealand, I practiced as an Architect in Europe with OMA in Holland and Herzog & de Meuron in Switzerland and worked on several large-scale civic projects and urban master plans. I serve as a Trustee on the Hillary Institute board, the Ohu Foundation board and I am the Founding Partner of Ohu Development and Founding Director XCHC.

Jade Kake: Whangārei    Architecture and Urban Design, Matakohe Architecture and Urbanism Ltd   Jade Kake (Ngāpuhi - Te Parawhau me Ngāti Hau, Te Arawa, Whakatōhea) is an architectural designer, writer and housing advocate. Her design practice is focussed on working with Māori organisations on their marae, papakāinga and civic projects, and in working with mana whenua groups to express their cultural values and narratives through urban design. In 2018, she successfully delivered season one of Indigenous Urbanism, a place-based storytelling podcast about the spaces we inhabit, and the community drivers and practitioners who are shaping those environments and decolonising through design. She has written for a variety of housing and architecture magazines and contributed chapters to several books on architecture and urbanism. Jade is a frequent speaker on housing and design related matters on panels, and at conferences and public events, both domestically and internationally.    Contact:  jade@matakohe.org.nz

Jade Kake: Whangārei

Architecture and Urban Design, Matakohe Architecture and Urbanism Ltd

Jade Kake (Ngāpuhi - Te Parawhau me Ngāti Hau, Te Arawa, Whakatōhea) is an architectural designer, writer and housing advocate. Her design practice is focussed on working with Māori organisations on their marae, papakāinga and civic projects, and in working with mana whenua groups to express their cultural values and narratives through urban design. In 2018, she successfully delivered season one of Indigenous Urbanism, a place-based storytelling podcast about the spaces we inhabit, and the community drivers and practitioners who are shaping those environments and decolonising through design. She has written for a variety of housing and architecture magazines and contributed chapters to several books on architecture and urbanism. Jade is a frequent speaker on housing and design related matters on panels, and at conferences and public events, both domestically and internationally.

Contact: jade@matakohe.org.nz

Barnaby  is a publisher, designer, and researcher/activist/educator. Barnaby’s recently completed doctoral thesis examined the political character of the temporary projects that emerged post-quake Christchurch; discovering a surprisingly connection to long-term infrastructural issues in the city. In 2018 he was the creative director of the major event of Christchurch’s Festival of Transitional Architecture (FESTA), exploring the relationship between food and the city, and is currently the creative director of the Sydney Architecture Festival. Barnaby has taught design and architecture studios in universities around Australia and New Zealand including RMIT and UTS. His research, teaching, and practice are pre-occupied with notions of time and temporality. He has worked on very small temporary projects and very long-term projects such as the Sagrada Familia in Barcelona. Barnaby is a co-founder and director of Freerange Press, publishing books on design, politics, and the city since 2007. He more recently joined WalkSydney, a new advocacy group to promote pedestrian travel in Sydney.

Barnaby is a publisher, designer, and researcher/activist/educator. Barnaby’s recently completed doctoral thesis examined the political character of the temporary projects that emerged post-quake Christchurch; discovering a surprisingly connection to long-term infrastructural issues in the city. In 2018 he was the creative director of the major event of Christchurch’s Festival of Transitional Architecture (FESTA), exploring the relationship between food and the city, and is currently the creative director of the Sydney Architecture Festival. Barnaby has taught design and architecture studios in universities around Australia and New Zealand including RMIT and UTS. His research, teaching, and practice are pre-occupied with notions of time and temporality. He has worked on very small temporary projects and very long-term projects such as the Sagrada Familia in Barcelona. Barnaby is a co-founder and director of Freerange Press, publishing books on design, politics, and the city since 2007. He more recently joined WalkSydney, a new advocacy group to promote pedestrian travel in Sydney.